The Museum Column

cultural intelligence, exhibit reviews, museum news


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Cat videos: a museum topic?

I have been told on reliable authority that cute cat videos are some of the most popular content on YouTube. In a complete change of pace, this post is an experiment to see if cat videos have their place in a blog about museums. Here is a carefully curated selection of videos.

Category one: cats in museums

Cats in the Hermitage Museum.

Category two: museums about cats

A museum in Ohio about cats.

Category three: art gallery film festival about cat videos

A cat video program a the Walker Art Gallery.

Category four: serious museological analysis of cat videos

A blog posting by the Center for the Future of Museums about the Walker Art Gallery cat video awards ceremony. This post originates from the American Alliance of Museums, the pre-eminent professional association internationally. And so, I think it is quite OK for a museum blog to include cat videos as content!


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“100 Years of Loss”: residential schools for Aboriginal people in Canada

I was watching a documentary about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on CBC’s The National last month. The program covered a hearing of the Commission in Vancouver from September 18th to 21st, noting that education is one of the Commission’s key roles. In the background of some footage taken at the hearing, I noticed an exhibition. I have since discovered that the exhibition, called 100 Years of Loss – The Residential School System in Canada, was created by the Legacy of Hope Foundation.

100 Years of Loss -- The Residential School System in Canada.  Displayed at the Ottawa Carleton District School Board, Ottawa, 15 to 25 October 2013.  Copyright Legacy of Hope Foundation, 2013.  Photo by Tania Budgell.

100 Years of Loss — The Residential School System in Canada. Displayed at the Ottawa Carleton District School Board, Ottawa, 15 to 25 October 2013. Copyright Legacy of Hope Foundation, 2013. Photo by Tania Budgell.

It interweaves personal stories of residential schools with archival images and has travelled across Canada to many venues, including other places where The Commission has held hearings. Seeing 100 Years of Loss led me to wonder if other exhibitions are helping to make the tragic story of residential schools better known? The answer to that question is “yes”.

This past summer the McCord Museum, working with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, created Honouring Memory – Canada’s Residential Schools. It was shown outside the museum, on McGill College Avenue, from June 19 to October 20, 2013. The media release for the exhibit was clear about the impetus for the project:

This exhibit of archival photographs recalls the fate of thousands of Aboriginal children, who willingly or by force, grew up in residential schools intended to eradicate all traces of their culture. … By honouring these stories, the Museum is taking part in the process of healing and reconciliation initiated by the Commission.

Honouring Memory -- Canada's Residential Schools.  Photo credit: Marilyn Aitken, McCord Museum

Honouring Memory — Canada’s Residential Schools. Photo credit: Marilyn Aitken, McCord Museum

Although the exhibit is now closed, if you would like to know more about Honouring Memory – Canada’s Residential Schools, the McCord Museum has posted the text and photographs from each exhibit panel here.

Other exhibitions about residential schools and their impacts are currently on view in at the University of British Columbia. One is called Speaking to Memory: Images and Voices from St. Michael’s Residential School and can be seen at the University’s Museum of Anthropology until March 2nd 2014. This exhibit presents images recently donated to the Museum by one of the St. Michael’s Residential School’s students. As the Museum’s website notes “The photos provide a rare and moving glimpse of residential school life through the eyes of students as they made a life for themselves away from families and home communities.”

The University is also currently presenting an exhibition of contemporary art at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. Witness: Art and Canada’s Indian Residential Schools features artists from British Columbia and across Canada including artists who directly experienced Indian residential schools as well as those who are witnesses to their residual impact.

Lisa Jackson, Savage, 2009.  Production still from video.  From the exhibition "Witnesses: Art and Canada's Indian Residential Schools", Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia (September 6-December 1, 2012).

Lisa Jackson, Savage, 2009. Production still from video. From the exhibition “Witnesses: Art and Canada’s Indian Residential Schools”, Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, University of British Columbia (September 6-December 1, 2012).

Witness is accompanied by a second installation, this one in the University’s Walter C. Koerner Library, a work by artist Cathy Busby called We are Sorry 2013.

The history of Canada’s residential schools for Aboriginal people is heartbreaking. The work of the Truth and Reconciliation Committee is continuing and public exhibitions make a contribution to building awareness.